Gaggia is well known for making the best entry-level semi automatic espresso machines for home use. The Gaggia Classic is a favorite among home baristas, and is has been for many years. It’s a classic machine, alright! Another great choice for a home machine is the Gaggia Carezza Deluxe, which is the subject of this post. It’s a close competitor to the Classic, but just how close (or far apart) are they in terms of features? And which would make a better choice?

Keep reading for the answers…

First, let’s start with the features of the Gaggia Carezza Deluxe:

  • Compact semi-automatic espresso maker.
  • Pressurized portafilter can extract ground coffee or ESE pods.
  • Pre-infusion functions wets the coffee ground before extraction to ensure full saturation and an even extraction.
  • Pannarello steam wand which doubles as a hot water dispenser.
  • Water reservoir located at the front of the machine with a visible window for water level inspection. 47 oz capacity.
  • Heat up time is around 1 minute.
  • Controls: buttons and a dial knob for steam.
  • Wattage: 1300
  • Housing: stainless steel with plastic.

Click here to learn more about the Gaggia Carezza Deluxe, read the customer reviews and buy it.

Features of Gaggia Classic:

  • Commercial style stainless steel espresso maker.
  • Commercial 58mm portafilter. Can be used with pressurized baskets, too.
  • Pannarello steam wand doubles as a hot water dispenser.
  • Controls: switch buttons and knob for steam.
  • Water reservoir capacity: 72 oz.
  • Wattage: 1450
  • Housing: stainless steel.

Click here to learn more about the Gaggia Classic, read the customer reviews and buy it.

Gaggia Carezza Deluxe vs. Classic, What’s The Difference?

Although both espresso makers can make a quality shot of espresso or a nice creamy cup of cappuccino, there’s difference between the two machines:

Portafilters:

The Gaggia Carezza has a pressurized portafilter, while the Classic model gives you the option of using either a pressurized basket or non-pressurized.

Pressurized vs. non-pressurized portafilters:

If you’re wondering about the difference between pressurized and non-pressurized filter baskets, and if it should mean something to you, here’s how they’re different:

  • With a pressurized basket (the basket with a screen filter), the machine forces the coffee grounds into those tiny holes, the water usually stays in contact with the coffee longer before the coffee comes out. The Pressurization is what usually makes the crema on top of the espresso shot. This type of filter is a great option for beginners with moderate grinders, because in this case, the precision of the grind isn’t as important (it still has to be fine ground, though).
  • With a non-pressurized filter, the quality of the shot is all on you. The coffee grind has to be precisely right, the contact time has to be perfect and any inconsistency will definitely result in a bad shot.

Housing:

  • The Carezza combines stainless steel with plastic. But the body is mostly plastic.
  • The Classic is mostly stainless steel with few plastic parts.

Water Reservoir Capacity:

  • Carezza: 47 oz
  • Classic: 72 oz

Wattage:

  • Carezza: 1300 watts
  • Classic: 1450 watts

Which One Do You Buy?

We actually prefer the quality of the Classic way over the Carezza Deluxe. It’s a commercial-style espresso maker but made to accommodate the home user without any complications. With the Classic, you have the option of using a pressurized or non-pressurized basket, so you have the option for an easy shot extraction with room to practice the use of non-pressurized shots. The built of it, stainless steel housing, makes it a more durable machine. The only problem with the Gaggia Classic over the Carezza Deluxe is that it takes longer to heat up, up to 5 minutes, but that’s because it’s a more powerful machine, so that’s understandable.

Click here to learn more about the Gaggia Classic, read the customer reviews and buy it.

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